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So you lose weight if your partner does not want to



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Photo: Shutterstock / CrispyPork

If you're trying to lose weight, it can be difficult if you're not adequately supported or have a pretty bad influence (like a partner who loves to sit on chips late at night!) Normally, the person you are with or with whom you live is on board, and it is much easier to tip the scale and stay on course.

However, you can not change the habits of others no matter how much you do. I want that. That does not mean that you need to feel defeated and give up hope for your weight loss efforts. You can still focus on yourself and make the right improvements, regardless of your partner's eating habits. Here are a few tips that can help you lose those pounds in no time.

Cook healthy and delicious food at home

If your partner is used to eating soft meals such as pizza and pasta, or often picking up some Chipo On the way home from work, but you try To lose weight. You can still enjoy these types of meals when cooked at home in a healthier, skinned recipe. Instead of normal pasta, you can use palm or zucchini hearts, says Brooke Zigler, MPP, RDN, LD, or you could get a cauliflower crust instead of a regular pizza crust, she says. (See also: This 30-Day Challenge is the Essential Guide to Preparing Meals for Beginners.)

"Your partner may really enjoy these meals because they have the same great tastes," she adds. And even if they come to take away, you have something nutrient you can still be proud of. "Losing weight does not mean you have to do without taste," she explains.

Make a meal with alternatives

If it's taco night and you drop the regular tortillas for a salad wrap, you still offer your partner a taco shell if they want it. "By preparing a meal, but choosing your partner to choose a regular tortilla, you're both happy," she says. That way you will not be burdened with a fattening option on the table like a cheesy casserole when you & # 39; Eat tacos again.

The same goes for the pasta night. "You can make a delicious bolognese sauce, but you can also eat zucchini pasta while your partner regularly has noodles," she says. You do not ask your partner to give up the food that he likes, and you do not have to prepare two completely different meals and feel the urge to eat one (or two) bites of them.

Have Healthy Desserts Ready

If your partner eats a bowl of ice cream, that does not mean you have to give up all the desserts. "You could have a smaller portion of ice cream or use lower-calorie ice creams that still taste delicious and you do not feel left out when your partner has a dessert," she says. (See also: Healthy Dessert Recipes with No Added Sugar and Tons of Aroma)

You can also make your own healthier desserts or buy scaled-down brands your lover might love, such as a "beautiful cream" from banana or a portioned ice cream sandwich.

Talk It Out

Even though your partner may not be trying to lose weight, that does not mean he's not supportive. "It's important that you understand why you want to lose weight and what your goals are, whether you want to lose weight to prevent illness, control your health, or lose weight to give you more energy. It's helpful for your partner To understand your motivation, "she says.

Tell me that you really only want them to be there for you, even if you do not want to lose weight yourself.

Recruit Your Partner [1
9659006] "Your partner can be more supportive if he understands what your plan is and how you want to implement it," she says. Let them know how they can help and support you.

Be as specific as possible. "You may want to share photos of your food with them to help you in this way, or you might want them to shop for groceries, but you help them give a grocery list of groceries they want," she says. You can help your partner engage in your weight loss efforts so that none of them feel isolated and the process as a team becomes so much easier.

This story originally appeared on CookingLight.com by Isadora Baum.


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