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Does weeds make you anxious or relaxed? Here is the reason.



There are many people out there who claim cannabis is the key to alleviating fears and achieving a state of complete relaxation. Yes, you know who you are.

But there are probably as many people who claim that weeds cause them panic, paranoia, and anxious thoughts – making their fear a million times worse.

had experienced both. Sometimes a few strokes are all I need to stop the race, relax my shoulders and (finally!) Turn off the effect.

Other times, these few hits can throw me into a full blown panic hyperventilating on the bathroom floor. I am convinced that I will be caught high and in the hot, anxious disorder that is my brain from now on, for all eternity.

So, what's up? Why is weeds a virtual panacea against the fears of some people and completely anxiety-provoking for others?

And, more importantly, how can you make sure that your experience with cannabis makes you feel less anxious and completely relaxed ̵

1; instead of panicking?

The first thing you understand about cannabis and anxiety is that not all weeds are created equal.

There are hundreds of compounds (known as cannabinoids) that are produced by the cannabis plant, but when it comes to anxiety, there are two things you need to know about: tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) People are thinking about it when they think about cannabis. It is the connection that is responsible for making you "high".

On the other hand, CBD is not psychotropic – which means it does not cause the same "oh man, I'm so worried" feeling that you get from THC.

There is no single approach to cannabis – it is not that CBD is better than THC or vice versa.

Understanding the differences between the two – and how they affect your particular type of anxiety – can, however, help make your experience with cannabis more anxiety- soothes and less anxiety- induced . ,

"There are many different types of anxiety that definitely affect how people respond to different forms of treatment or therapeutic intervention with something like cannabis.

"Anxiety can be forward-looking, or it could be generalized or linked to depression, or more likely to be a panic disorder," says Emma Chasen, cannabis pedagogue and founder of Eminent Consulting Firm. "And so all of these different types react differently to cannabis. "

If your anxiety comes with a general "bla" sensation, THC can be just what you need to lift your spirits. "In people with depression-related anxiety [or]THC can actually be very helpful because it's euphoric," says Chasen.

However, THC can cause a number of side effects, especially high doses, such as increased heart rate or racing thoughts. This can actually increase certain types of anxiety. And here comes CBD into play.

"CBD is not psychotropic and will not give you any of these negative side effects," says Chasen.

"It may help to boost some anticipation, slightly more general social anxiety and may even help with panic disorders as it affects and interacts with your serotonin system."

In short, too much THC can definitely produce a more anxiety-inducing smoke, while CBD helps you relax, but not stew.

Fortunately, you can also eat your cake – according to Chasen, a blend of THC and CBD may be the best way to use cannabis to feel less anxious and relaxed (and get a nice buzz).

"I would definitely look for something with a mixed ratio of cannabinoids," says Chasen. "A ratio of THC to CBD of 1: 1 or 2: 1 is usually very helpful to stimulate euphoria and reduce anxiety – especially if you take a very slow and low dose [with your]."

Finding the right balance between CBD and THC is the key to keeping your fear at bay while consuming cannabis. But if you want to take the benefits of weed control to the next level, you should look for something else – and these are terpenes.

Terpenes are the fragrant oils that give each cannabis plant its own aroma. And like cannabinoids, different terpenes have different effects – including effects that can relieve anxiety.

According to Chasen, there are terpenes with "proven anti-anxiety properties".

According to Chasen, there are three terpenes that you should have looking for, if you want to use cannabis to treat your anxiety – limonene, linalool, and beta-caryophyllene.

If you feel depressed or depressed in your anxiety, look for limonene, which can provoke euphoria and give your step a bit of uproar.

"Limonen [is] the citrus fruit terpene [and] interacts with your serotonin and dopamine receptors and stimulates euphoria, making it an excellent way to relieve anxiety," says Chasen.

If you're more into the market for a great de-stressor that helps you end a solid night with your eyes closed, try linalool, a lavender compound that's soothing and relaxing. [19659002] "We know that lavender is a good de-stressor and linalool is a lavender compound – it's the same with cannabis," says Chasen.

And if you're looking for something between the euphoria of limonene and the cool drowsiness of linalool, try out beta-caryophyllene.

"Beta caryophyllene, which is contained in black pepper and cinnamon, also has some really wonderful anti-anxiety properties," says Chasen.

"If limonene is the more uplifting and linalool the more sedative, then beta-caryophyllene is somehow exactly in the middle. It makes more sense to like a glass of red wine at the end of a long day [to help you unwind.].

The right mix of THC, CBD and anxiolytic terpenes is the key to a positive cannabis experience. But there are a few other things you should keep in mind to make sure your next foray through the weed world is relaxed and without fear:

  • Control Your Consumption . There are many different ways to consume cannabis (tinctures and gums and flowers, oh my god!). But if you want to have the most control over your experience, try edibles. "With edible foods you can really take a very precise dose," says Chasen. "Smoking makes it much harder to measure your dose."
  • Take it slowly and slowly . If you are taking THC, it is best to start with a low dose and then slowly add more THC until you find the dose that gives you the maximum level you want – without the supplement of anxiety. If you use food, Chasen recommends starting with 2.5 milligrams. "Watch how you feel about it, and do not consume for the whole [episode]," says Chasen. If you feel you need more, increase your dose by 1 milligram per serving period until you find your sweet spot.
  • CBD counteracts THC-induced anxiety . If you are overly anxious about THC, you can counteract these anxious feelings with a healthy dose of CBD. "Smoking or CBD vapors can immediately relieve THC-induced anxiety," explains Chasen. Depending on your THC dose, you may need to take a fair amount of CBD to get rid of the fear – but it will definitely help you to feel better (and faster).

Cannabis can have a variety of experiences with the anxiety spectrum. But if you understand how to use weeds in ways that reduce anxiety rather than exacerbating it, the next time you use cannabis, you are much closer to the "most relaxed" side of the spectrum than to "fearful AF." Page.


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